10th Anniversary Alumni Spotlight: Meet Maya Shankar

Published on

Nov 10, 2009

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  • Ren

    This video definitely inspired my practice session yesterday. What a story. What a SOUND Maya makes with her violin! Beautiful.

  • http://www.got2twinkle.com Ms. Cynthia

    I am listening to Maya play the Melody from Orpheus and Eurydice and thinking what an intuitive sense of tone color she has developed for this piece. I can’t wait to hear what other pieces she interprets so expressively with this gift. Thank goodness that the Academy inspired her to rediscover the violinist that we almost lost.
    There is another part of me that is out raged that such injuries are still manafest among young musicians. With all the knowledge and know how available to us as teachers this should not still be happening to young musicians. How often are these conditions caused when students are first developing their technic and lie dormant like a time bomb waiting to strike when students need the most stamina and physical capasity.
    Music is supposed to be a healing experience not one that brings us injures. We can do better than this. At a time when we would like to increase the number of young beginning musicians in our schools and urban communities it is even more apparent than ever that we need to provide the best possible training for the teachers that are most likely to start those new students.
    I want to thank Maya for having the courage to share her story of bewilderment and put all of us who are music teachers on notice.

  • http://www.fromthetop.org fttgreenroom

    Ms. Cynthia. Thank you so much for your thoughtful response to our telling of Maya Shankar’s story. You raise several excellent points.

    How can we be doing a better job of training young artists to prevent injury?

    What experiences have others had with this difficult subject.

    We’d like to hear from you!

  • http://www.got2twinkle.com Ms. Cynthia

    I am listening to Maya play the Melody from Orpheus and Eurydice and thinking what an intuitive sense of tone color she has developed for this piece. I can’t wait to hear what other pieces she interprets so expressively with this gift. Thank goodness that the Academy inspired her to rediscover the violinist that we almost lost.
    There is another part of me that is out raged that such injuries are still manifest among young musicians. With all the knowledge and know how available to us as teachers this should not still be happening to young musicians. How often are these conditions caused when students are first developing their technic and lie dormant like a time bomb waiting to strike when students need the most stamina and physical capacity.
    Music is supposed to be a healing experience not one that brings us injures. We can do better than this. At a time when we would like to increase the number of young beginning musicians in our schools and urban communities it is even more apparent than ever that we need to provide the best possible training for the teachers that are most likely to start those new students.
    I want to thank Maya for having the courage to share her story of bewilderment and put all of us who are music teachers on notice.

    This time my spell checker worked. Thanks

  • Marcelina Suchocka

    This is such an inspirational story. I know that injuries don’t happen often, but when they do, it is usually serious and is devastating to the musician. I have a friend that once broke his arm, and being a percussionist, he could not practice or go to rehearsals.
    Hearing Maya’s story gives me inspiration. No matter what happens to you, physically OR mentally, you can overcome it. It can be a small event; a thought or meeting someone, or something so huge like playing with Joshua Bell !

  • Katie Berryhill

    I was telling my teacher about Maya Shankar’s story, and when I said that she lives in Oxford, my teacher instantly said “She should go see Kato Havas.” Kato was my teacher’s teacher, and among other things she specializes in helping students with injuries. Kato is in her 80s, but still teaching in Oxford. I have her contact information, so if you’re able to get this information to Maya, please contact me and I’ll give it to you.